Since 2016 when Facebook allows businesses to deliver automated customer support, e-commerce guidance, content and interactive experiences through chatbots, a large variety of chatbots for Facebook Messenger platform were developed.[37] In 2016, Russia-based Tochka Bank launched the world's first Facebook bot for a range of financial services, in particularly including a possibility of making payments. [38] In July 2016, Barclays Africa also launched a Facebook chatbot, making it the first bank to do so in Africa. [39]

However, the revelations didn’t stop there. The researchers also learned that the bots had become remarkably sophisticated negotiators in a short period of time, with one bot even attempting to mislead a researcher by demonstrating interest in a particular item so it could gain crucial negotiating leverage at a later stage by willingly “sacrificing” the item in which it had feigned interest, indicating a remarkable level of premeditation and strategic “thinking.”
Marketer’s Take: While I didn’t like being directed to a website to finalize my purchase, I understand why Spring decided on this approach given how the Messenger platform was just released. Yet, this may be a sound strategy if you’re looking to augment upselling and cross-selling opportunities or looking for deeper analytics than what Facebook Messenger is providing.
Yes. Messenger bots are approved by Facebook before being made available inside the Messenger app so you can rest assured that they aren’t trying to steal your identity (or anything else). What’s more is a bot is tied to a Facebook page and a Facebook app making it all the more inconvenient to use for fraudulent activity. That said, don’t exchange private and/or personal information with a bot. Finally, because Messenger doesn’t support credit cards and purchasing just yet, anything you buy will likely be done via a browser with a bot aiding you so far as to place an order. If you want, you can always block a bot.
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